Photography Contest

Black and White

Deadline |

CLOSED

Theme |

Light

Territory |

Worldwide

Eligibility |

Submissions are open to all photographers both professional and amateur working in all photographic mediums and styles. International entries are welcomed. Work that has been previously exhibited at A Smith Gallery is not eligible.

Entry Fees |

$38/5 images

Prizes |

Exhibition
"Black and white is obviously a description of a type of photograph. It is also a reference to things being absolute, easily defined. In automobile racing the black and white checkered flag signifies the end of the race.

The words black and white can signal a lack of color. Black can exist without light. White is made of light. Mix them and you get grey. Grey is a color. Black and white photographs typically are chock full of greys.

Simultaneously show someone a black and white photograph of cherries, apples and firetrucks, ask them what color they are, and they will say "red." They can be wrong apples can be green, cherries can be purple and firetrucks can be yellow. Show someone a black and white photo of a still life of charcoal, inkwells and crows and they will correctly identify them as black.

Interesting how somethings are called black but are actually brown or burnt umber or something is called white when it is pink or tan? If you showed someone a still life of black people and asked them what color they are they would answer, "black." If you showed them a still life of white people they would say, "white." What if you asked the same questions of someone that had never seen a black and white photograph, that lived only in a world of color and no labels?.." From "Lost In The Neighborhood With Books" By Franklin Cincinnatus

JUROR: Eric T. Kunsman will be the juror for "black/white". Eric was born and raised in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. While in high school, he was heavily influenced by the death of the steel industry and its place in American history. The exposure to the work of Walker Evans during this time hooked Eric onto photography. Eric had the privilege to study under Lou Draper, who became Eric's most formative mentor. He credits Lou with influencing his approach as an educator, photographer, and contributing human being.